What kind of nutrients will optimize your bone’s health? What elements improve joints mobility and reduces inflammation? The bone/joint supplementation depends on the age, hormones, activity, stress, gut health, allergies, toxic load and medication. Someone with a recent bone injury or surgery will need a different level of support for repair and rebuilt of the bone/joints than someone with osteoarthritis or osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis is major risk for broken bones among elderly. Osteopenia is the precursor to osteoporosis that starts with thinning and weakening of the bones which starts as early as in the 30s. The risk of osteoporosis increases with age, certain medical conditions such as kidney disease, removal of ovaries, hyperthyroidism, anorexia, and alcoholism. Among medication that increases the risk of osteoporosis such as proton pump inhibitors (omeprazole), Lithium, anti seizure, chemotherapy, SSRI, and glucorticosteroids. Right nutritional supplementation, diet and exercise help with preventing osteoporosis risks.

The right combination of minerals, micronutrients, collagen and anti-inflammatory are best when taken together to support the matrix of the bone/joints. For example, Genistein (isoflavone) helps build bone density in osteopenia and osteoporosis especially in postmenopausal women because acts as mild SERM(selective estrogen receptor modulator).

To avoid because leach calcium: caffeine, and soft drinks (phosphoric acid)

REFERENCES:
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2. Stendig-Lindberg G, Tepper R, Leichter I. Trabecular bone density in a two year controlled trial of peroral magnesium in osteoporosis. Magnes Res. 1993 Jun;6(2):155-63.
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* The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the research and experience of Dr. Wright and his community. Dr. Wright encourages you to make your own health care decisions based upon your research and in partnership with a qualified health care professional. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition, consult your health care professional before using products based on this content.information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the research and experience of Dr. Wright and his community. Dr. Wright encourages you to make your own health care decisions based upon your research and in partnership with a qualified health care professional. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition, consult your health care professional before using products based on this content.
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