In our healthy gut there are over trillion of microbacteria that are essential to our life. The greater the diversity of microbiota the better digestion, absorption and defense against pathogens. The microorganisms that live in the intestinal tract are referred as intestinal flora (microbiota). Probiotics are found alive in some fermented food or can be delivered in capsule form. They help maintain the “friendly bacteria” that helps with digestion, production of vitamins, maintain mental health and over all being. Prebiotics are “food” for the bacteria in the intestines.

A good source of prebiotics comes from plant fiber that undergo through a process of fermentation in our intestine. Probiotics are found in fermented foods like tempeh, aged cheese, cottage cheese, fermented meats, fermented vegetable, kefir, kimchi, kombucha, miso, natto, sour cream, and yogurt. Prebiotics are the food for the probiotics after they go through a process of fermentation in the gut. A good source of prebiotics source are most found in vegetable and fruits. When your diet is rich in fermenting fiber and in short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) the healthier your microbiota.

What are some signs bad gut bacteria?

Constipation, excess intestinal gas, chronic diarrhea, chronic bad breath, candida, vitamin B deficiency, dairy product allergies and intolerances which ultimately lead to neurological problems and other diseases. More and more research links certain gut microbiota with weight gain and mental health.

There is an increasing need of supplementation with probiotics because of the usage of antibiotics, poor diets, stress, disease, malabsorption and aging. Some probiotics minimizes the allergic reactions, diarrhea, constipation, improve lactose intolerance, ulcerative colitis, vitamin K synthesis, atopic dermatitis, and fight the overgrowth of bacteria and parasites. More and more research shows a correlation between neurodegenerative disease and microbiota.

Lactobacillus Rhamnosus

Lactobacillus Rhamnosus sometimes called “travel probiotic” because sometimes helps with occasional traveler’s diarrhea. Bacillus bifidum is important in healthy digestion of dairy products, breaking down of carbohydrates, fat, protein. L. Acidophilus colonizes the walls of small intestine and helps with the digestion of dairy foods.

L. Fermentum helps reduce occasional gas and bloating. Bifidobacterium strain B.Lactis Bl-04 helps prevent the toxic effect of wheat gliadin. Taking the right probiotic depends on the age. People over 50 years old should include this stain B.Infantis which reduces inflammation.

Finding the right probiotic formula is not an easy thing. Things to watch for are integrity, potency, proper storage, stability of probiotics in capsule, by passing the stomach acid, the right combination of certain organisms and stains. Probiotics have to survive through the manufacturing process, shelf life and through stomach acid.

Specific encapsulation procedure ensures the probiotics remain alive and fully potent. Taking in the account growing number of people with food intolerances, I look for probiotic formula that are dairy free and non GMO with a delivery of billion of CFU (colony-forming units) and the most diverse strains follow the protocol for at least 30 days.

 

 

References

1. Lin CK, Tsai HC, Lin PP, Tsen HY, Tsai CC. Lactobacillus acidophilus LAP5 able to inhibit the Salmonella choleraesuis invasion to the human Caco-2 epithelial cell. Anaerobe. 2008 Nov;14(5):251-5. Epub 2008 Aug 22.

2. Betsi GI, Papadavid E, Falagas ME. Probiotics for the treatment or prevention of atopic dermatitis: a review of the evidence from randomized controlled trials. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2008;9(2):93-103.

3. Prescott SL, Wickens K, Westcott L, Jung W, Currie H, Black PN, Stanley TV, Mitchell EA, Fitzharris P, Siebers R, Wu L, Crane J; Probiotic Study Group. Supplementation with Lactobacillus rhamnosus or Bifidobacterium lactis probiotics in pregnancy increases cord blood interferon-gamma and breast milk transforming growth factor-beta and immunoglobin A detection. Clin Exp Allergy. 2008 Oct;38(10):1606-14. Epub 2008 Jul 2.

4. Johnston BC, Supina AL, Ospina M, Vohra S. Probiotics for the prevention of pediatric antibioticassociated diarrhea. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2007 Apr 18;(2):CD004827.

5. Toki S, Kagaya S, Shinohara M, Wakiguchi H, Matsumoto T, Takahata Y, Morimatsu F, Saito H, Matsumoto K. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus casei suppress Escherichia coli-induced chemokine expression in intestinal epithelial cells. Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2009;148(1):45-58. Epub 2008 Aug 21.

6. Amit-Romach E, Uni Z, Reifen R. Therapeutic potential of two probiotics in inflammatory bowel disease as observed in the trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid model of colitis. Dis Colon Rectum. 2008 Dec;51(12):1828-36. Epub 2008 Jul 17.

* The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the research and experience of Dr. Wright and his community. Dr. Wright encourages you to make your own health care decisions based upon your research and in partnership with a qualified health care professional. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition, consult your health care professional before using products based on this content.information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the research and experience of Dr. Wright and his community. Dr. Wright encourages you to make your own health care decisions based upon your research and in partnership with a qualified health care professional. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition, consult your health care professional before using products based on this content.
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